Can’t Believe I’m going To Re-Post This

Dear Gordon Studio Trainees,

I am so proud of the progress you are making in TT.  Your focus, effort, and dedication is wonderful to behold.

I know you hear me when I say that form and quality bring better, faster results than weight and volume bring: especially if you can’t control the weight and handle the volume.

Jason gets a little bit blue in his posts, but he describes training and  lifting concepts better than I ever could.  If you want a great physique (girls or guys) please read this.

Here’s Jason:

Pecs and biceps.

The beach muscles.

They can be big but that doesn’t mean you’re strong. It
doesn’t give the look of strength and power. You’d never look
at a guy with big pecs and bi’s but no back and say, “that
guy’s a lifter.”

You just know he’s down at Gold’s doing the bench and curl
circuit all day, every day.

A guy with a jacked back commands respect, gets promotions
faster at work, is invited backstage at Victoria Secret’s
lingerie shows and is generally loved by children everywhere.

Shame, because the hardest area of the body for most people
to develop is the back.

That is, if they even try. In most public gyms dudes will
hardly ever do a row or deadlift. Bench and curls. Bench and
curls.

That leads to imbalances, possible injuries, and a terrible
look.

The informed ones; those who train their backs, often struggle
because of the fact that it’s not a mirror muscle.

You can’t see it. This makes it a harder to develop a
mind-muscle connection.

The first step to improving your back training is stripping a
few pounds off the bar (or dumbbell).

Most dudes go way too heavy when training pulling movements.

They’re heaving the weight and doing something that looks
more like they’re having a seizure than doing a bent over row.

I don’t know what muscles that movement trains, but it ain’t
working.

And it’s very distracting and annoying to the rest of us.

To get a little further away from the Pee Wee Herman end of
the scale and closer to the Dorian Yates end you’ve gotta
lighten the weight. (My emphasis C.G.)

And squeeze that sh*t.

In the classic bodybuilding film noir, Blood and Guts,
Dorian’s training partner yells at him to “SQUEEZE,” on every
rep he does of a pulling exercise.

Not just heave weight.

When you’re training back on one of your Renegade workouts,
decrease the weight, don’t rely on momentum to move it and
consciously squeeze your lats and mid back throughout the set.

Try to hold the contracted position for a second on each rep.

If you can’t hold it with control the weight’s too heavy.

And bump up the reps. There’s no reason to be doing a triple
on a row or chin up. Stick with sets of 8-15. You’ll get more
out of it.

The pulling muscles can take a lot of work. That’s one of the
reasons every Renegade program contains more pulling than
pushing.

And because, like I said, a bigger back gets you discounts at
restaurants, free airline miles and the adoration of lingerie
league football players everywhere.

Squeeze that sh*t, son.

Jay Ferruggia
RenegadeInnerCircle.com

Catherine again: Right now, the part of my physique that gives me the most pride is my back.  I hardly ever see it, but I see you all making your backs stronger and tighter, and it makes me so proud.  So dominate the weight ladies and gentlemen, even if it needs to be a light one.

Author: Catherine

Catherine Gordon is the author of the nutritional program: Sugar Freedom at www.sugarfreedom.com. She is also the author of "Keep the Change" Transform your body for good 2nd edition, at amazon.com. She is member of the National Weight Control Registry, and she was named the Certified Turbulence Trainer of the Year in 2013.

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